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Frak You

Frak You was developed by Josiah Brock , Matthew Forsthoefel, and Christopher Hendry.

Type: Trick-taking game in which the cards from a trick are returned to the winner's hand.
Players: 3-5 Deck: 52-card standard Anglo-American pack. Cards rank from highest to lowest: A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2
Play: Clockwise
Origin: United States

The following rules are for four players. They can be adjusted for other numbers of people.

  1. You cannot tell anyone the rules. they must learn the game by observing or by reading this article.
  2. Frak You is played with 3-5 players.
  3. The object of the game is to lose all of your cards.
  4. The entire deck is dealt as equally as possible to the players.
  5. After the cards are dealt for the first time, each player simultaneously passes three cards face down to the person to their left. In the second deal three cards are passed to the right, in the third across to the player sitting opposite, in the fourth players keep the cards they were dealt. In subsequent deals this sequence is repeated.
  6. The first trick is led by the two of clubs
  7. The highest card of led suit wins the trick, except in special circumstances (see Special Cards). Suit led must be played by other players unless they have none of that suit, in which case any other suit may be played
  8. When a trick is won, it is placed faced-down on the table in front of the winner. It can only be viewed by the player who won (or Trick Master).
  9. The person who wins the trick leads the next trick.
  10. When the Trick Master wins another trick, the new trick replaces the old on the table and the old goes back into the Trick Master's hand.
  11. If you have no cards in your hand, but a trick you have won is on the table, you must pick up those cards and put them into your hand. If you have no cards in hand and none on the table, you drop out of the play, but the others continue until only two players remain.
  12. The moment a card hits the table, IT HAS BEEN PLAYED, unless the player has reneged (i.e. failed to follow suit when able to).
  13. If someone takes a trick, even if by mistake, it is theirs, unless disputed.
  14. When only two players remain, they both lose.

Special Cards

  1. The three of clubs wins every trick it is played in (except when paired with the ace of spades - see below). It wins even if it is played on a lead of a different suit, when the holder has no cards of the suit that was led. However, it is a club and therefore can only be played whenever a club can legally be played.
  2. The ace of spades loses every trick it is played in. It is a spade, so if a spade is led and your only spade is the ace you must play it. If it is led alone, the other players must play spades. The ace of spades can also be played along with another card, and in that case it counts as belonging to the suit of the card it is paired with. That suit becomes trump for the trick, so if any other cards of that suit are played, the trick is won by the highest card in that suit (other than the one paired with the spade ace). However, players must still play the suit of the card led if they can.

Example 1: Player A leads heart4, player B with no hearts plays diamond9, player C, also having no hearts plays spadeA+diamondK, and player D follows suit with heartQ.
B wins the trick. C's play makes diamonds trump for that trick, but the king does not win because the spade ace accompanies it. Therefore the diamond 9 is the highest trump played, and wins the trick.

Example 2: Player A leads heart4, player B plays heart9, player C, having no hearts plays spadeA+club3, and player D follows suit with heartQ.
D wins the trick. The ace of spades allows the 3 of clubs to lose.

Example 3: Player A leads heart4, player B with no hearts plays diamond9, player C, also having no hearts plays spadeA+diamondK, and player D, who also has no hearts, throws the club3.
D wins the trick. B's diamond 9 is a trump, as in example 1, but the club 3 played alone is stronger.


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Last updated 3rd June 2009