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Domino Games

This page gives an alphabetical list of the domino games for which there are rules (or in some cases links to rules) on pagat.com. The entry for each game indicates the number of players, number and type of dominoes needed, and the type of game. Further explanation can be found below the table, and in more detail on other pages. As well as traditional games, the list includes many invented domino games, which may be known only to a few players, and have in many cases been contributed by the people or groups who invented them: these are listed in italics.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z #

GamePlayersEquipmentGame type
All Fives dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching fives or threes
All Threes Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching fives or threes
Auction Draw Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Austrian Dominoes 2–4  [8:8] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Bagchen 4  [C32]×2 plain trick multi trick match dice
Bergen 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching bergen scoring
Big Game, The 4  [8:8] point trick
Billitonnen 3–5  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Bingo dominoes 2  [6:6] point trick
Blind Hughie Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Block Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Block Dominoes with Spinners 2–4  [6:6] connecting:cross connecting:tree equal end matching shedding
Bonanza Pai Gow 2–8  [C32] partition
Broadway 4  [6:6] connecting:network equal end matching pattern scoring
Build Up 2  [6:6]×2 connecting:stacks other matching rules
Buki Dominoes 4  [8:8] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Canton 2–4  [6:6] fishing
Castle Rock 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  [6:6] connecting:arm fishing equal end matching
Ch'i Tái Shap see K'ap Tái Shap 2+  [C32]×8 draw & discard
Challenge dominoes 2–4, 5, 6, 7  [6:6]×2 match dice shedding
Chicken Foot 2, 3, 4–7, 8–10  [9:9] [12:12] connecting:tree equal end matching shedding
Chiva 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Collecting Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] draw & discard
Concentration Dominoes 2–4, 5–7  [6:6] other types
Cosmic Turtle 1  [C32] other types
CrissCross 1  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching shedding
Cuban Dominoes 4  [9:9] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Cut Throat Dominoes Jamaican 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Cyprus 4–10  [9:9] [12:12] connecting:star equal end matching shedding
Dancing Dragons 2–4  [C32] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Dice and Dominoes 2–5  [6:6]×2 match dice shedding
Diominoes 2, 3, 4  [6:6] match dice
Divide and Conquer 2  [6:6] other types
Domijong 2–8  [6:6]×4 draw & discard
Domino Bead Game 2–4  [6:6]×2 connecting:network other matching rules pattern scoring
Domino Cribbage 2  [6:6] adding
Domino Euchre 2, 3, 4  [6:6] plain trick
Domino Golf 2–5  [12:12] other types
Domino Loo 2–4  [6:6] plain trick
Domino Pinochle 3  [6:6] point trick
Domino Poker 2–4  [6:6] other types
Domino Roads 3, 4  [6:6]×2 connecting:disconnec match dice equal end matching pattern scoring
Domino Rounce 2–4  [6:6] plain trick
Domino Twenty-One 2–5  [6:6] adding
Dominoes Jamaican 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Dominoes Latin Partnership 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Dominoes Freecell Solitaire 1  [6:6] [9:9] [12:12] connecting:disconnec other matching rules pattern scoring
Dominoes-Matrix 2–5  [6:6] [9:9] [12:12] connecting:network matador matching pattern scoring
Domizerka 3  [6:6] plain trick
Doscientos 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Double Bergen 2–4  [6:6] [12:12] connecting:line connecting:cross equal end matching bergen scoring
Double Draw Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Double Takes 2–4  [15:15] point trick
Double-Hand Dominoes see Twist'em 2–9  [6:6] partition
Doubles in the Boneyard 3  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Draw Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Eleven Point Black Tile 3, 4  [6:6] point trick
Engine 191 2–4  [6:6] [9:9] connecting:star equal end matching shedding
Euchre dominoes 2, 3, 4  [6:6] plain trick
Five Up Dominoes 2, 3, 4  [6:6] connecting:tree equal end matching fives or threes
Fives and Threes Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching fives or threes
Flower & Scorpion 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line match dice equal end matching bergen scoring
Forty-Two see Texas 42 4  [6:6] point trick
Freeze Out Dominoes 2–4, 5–7  [6:6] other types
French Dominoes 4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching shedding
Gallinazo 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Gaple 4, 5  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Heaven Nine see Tien Gow 4  [C32] plain trick multi trick
High Fives 2–8  [15:15] fishing
Homo Homini Lupus 4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching shedding
Honest John 3–8  [9:9] [12:12] connecting:star equal end matching train family shedding
Horse Race Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:tree equal end matching fives or threes
Hungarian Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Italian Dominoes 2–5  [6:6] adding
K'ap Shap 2  [C32] draw & discard
K'ap Tái Shap 2+  [C32]×8 draw & discard
K'ím Shap see K'ap Shap 2  [C32] draw & discard
Kim Tái Shap see K'ap Tái Shap 2+  [C32]×8 draw & discard
Kiu Kiu see QiuQiu 2–4, 5, 6  [6:6] partition
Klondike dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:grid equal end matching pattern scoring
Leyden 2  [6:6] connecting:cross matador matching shedding
Loo Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] plain trick
Maltese Cross 2–4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching shedding
Matador 2–4, 5–8  [6:6] [9:9] [12:12] connecting:line matador matching shedding
Mexican Train 2, 3, 4–8, 9, 10  [9:9] [12:12] connecting:star equal end matching train family shedding
Milo 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Montana Domino Rummy 2–4  [6:6]×4 draw & discard
Moon 3, 4  [6:6] plain trick
Muggins Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching fives or threes
Network dominoes 2–5  [6:6] connecting:network equal end matching pattern scoring
Nos 3–5  [6:6] connecting:line connecting:cross matador matching shedding
Number 9 Train 2–5, 6  [9:9] connecting:star equal end matching train family shedding
One Arm Joe 5–9  [6:6] connecting:arm equal end matching shedding
One-Armed Pete see One Arm Joe 5–9  [6:6] connecting:arm equal end matching shedding
Pagchen see Bagchen 4  [C32]×2 plain trick multi trick match dice
Pai Gow 牌九 2–8  [C32] partition
Partner Dominoes Jamaican 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Partnership Dominoes Latin 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Pass and Out 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Pass-Pass 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Passing Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Peaks and Pits 2–5  [6:6] [9:9] connecting:line equal end matching pattern scoring
Pinochle Domino 3  [6:6] point trick
Prize Dominoes 2  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Pulle Dominoes 4  [8:8] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
QiuQiu 2–4, 5, 6  [6:6] partition
Quinientos 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Race Horse Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:tree equal end matching fives or threes
Reveille 2  [6:6] point trick
Romantiles 2–5  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Rounce Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] plain trick
Sebastopol 3, 4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching shedding
Sedma Dominoes 4  [6:6] connecting:arm equal end matching pattern scoring
Seven Rocks 4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching fives or threes
Seven-Toed Pete Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching fives or threes
Seven-Toed Pete Race Horse 2–4  [6:6] connecting:tree equal end matching fives or threes
Sevens Dominoes 2, 3  [6:6] connecting:grid other matching rules shedding
Shanghai dominoes 2–4  [6:6]×2 [6:6]×3 [6:6]×4 match dice
Shap Tsai see K'ap Shap 2  [C32] draw & discard
Shutout Dominoes see Chiva 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Sky Nine see Tien Gow 4  [C32] plain trick multi trick
Skyscraper 2, 3  [6:6]×2 connecting:stacks equal end matching shedding
Slosh 4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching train family shedding
Sniff 2–4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching fives or threes
Stormy Castle see Honest John 3–8  [9:9] [12:12] connecting:star equal end matching train family shedding
Stratego Dominoes 2  [6:6]×2 other types
Streets and Avenues 2–4  [9:9] [12:12] connecting:grid equal end matching pattern scoring
Super Dominoes 2–8  [15:15] connecting:star equal end matching shedding
Tau Ngau 3–6  [C32] adding
Texas 42 4  [6:6] point trick
Texas 88 6  [6:6]×2 point trick
That's It 2–8  [15:15] draw & discard
The Seven Pis 1  [6:6] connecting:disconnec equal end matching shedding
Thirty Point Black Tile 3, 4  [6:6] point trick
Three Dozen 2–5  [6:6] draw & discard
Throw-up Dominoes 2, 3  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Tian Jiu 天九 see Tien Gow 4  [C32] plain trick multi trick
Tiddly-Wink American 5–12  [6:6] [9:9] [12:12] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Tiddly-Wink British 3–12  [6:6] [9:9] [12:12] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Tien Gow 天九 4  [C32] plain trick multi trick
Tiu-U 釣魚 2, 3  [C32]×2 fishing
Trains 4–10  [9:9] [12:12] connecting:disconnec equal end matching train family shedding
Tsair Deng 3, 4  [C32] connecting:arm equal end matching shedding
Tsung Shap 2  [C32] fishing
Twenty-One Point Black Tile 3, 4  [6:6] point trick
Twist'em Dominoes 2–9  [6:6] partition
Two-Step 2  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
Up-Down-Stop 1  [6:6] connecting:disconnec other matching rules shedding
Up-Down-Stop44 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line other matching rules shedding
Wildouble 2–4  [6:6] [6:6]×2 [9:9] [9:9]×2 connecting:cross equal end matching shedding
Zigzag 3  [6:6] [7:7] [8:8] [9:9] plain trick
5 Up Dominoes 2, 3, 4  [6:6] connecting:tree equal end matching fives or threes
5's and 3's Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching fives or threes
7-Toed Pete Dominoes 2–4  [6:6] connecting:cross equal end matching fives or threes
7-Toed Pete Race Horse 2–4  [6:6] connecting:tree equal end matching fives or threes
11 Point Black Tile 3, 4  [6:6] point trick
21 Point Black Tile 3, 4  [6:6] point trick
30 Point Black Tile 3, 4  [6:6] point trick
42 see Texas 42 4  [6:6] point trick
99 dominoes see QiuQiu 2–4, 5, 6  [6:6] partition
200 Dominoes see Doscientos 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding
500 Dominoes see Quinientos 4  [6:6] connecting:line equal end matching shedding

Types of domino set

Western dominoes. Dominoes of this type appeared in Europe in the 18th century and are now familiar in most parts of the world, most often in the form of a double-six set in which each end of each tile has from zero to six spots. The set contains 28 tiles, one from each pairing of the numbers 0 to 6. Larger sets are possible. The double-nine set of 55 tiles, containing all possible pairs of numbers from 0 to 9, has been around since the early 20th century at least. Recently larger sets have become popular for some North American games, notably Mexican Train which uses a double-twelve set of 91 tiles, and double-15 sets (136 tiles) and even double-18 sets (190 tiles) can also be found. In the index above these sets are shown by the tile with the largest number of spots, for example [9:9] represents a double-nine set, and [6:6]×2 represents two double-six sets.

Chinese dominoes. These are thought to have originated in the 12th century and are presumably the ancestors of Western dominoes, though the exact relationship is obscure. The ends of each tile show numbers of spots from 1 to 6, clearly corresponding to the possible results of throwing two 6-sided dice. There are thus 21 different tiles but the set contains two copies of the 11 tiles of the 'sky' suit so that there are 32 tiles in total. Tradionally the 1 and 4 spots are red, as are half the spots of the double 6. These sets are shown in the index as [C32].

Types of domino game

Connecting games. This is the most familiar type of domino game in most parts of the world. Players take turns to add tiles to a layout. The tiles are normally played end to end, with the number of pips on the touching ends matching. These layouts can take various shapes depending on the connection rules:

  • arm - when the layout has just one open end to which tiles can be added, forming a line that grows in one direction only.
  • line - when the layout can extend from both ends of the initial tile, forming a line which can grow at either end.
  • cross - when the layout is begun with a double from which four arms can grow forming a cross shape.
  • star - when arms of the layout can grow in many directions from the initial tile, sometimes forming one arm for each player.
  • tree - when not only the initial double, but every double that is played allows the layout to branch.
  • network - when the layout can not only branch but rejoin, forming a complex structure that may include closed loops.
  • grid - when tiles are played in a regular two-dimensional grid.
  • disconnected layout - when there are several separate lines, columns or groups to which tiles can be added.
  • stacks - when the tiles are stacked on top of one another according to some rule.

In most connecting games players can add tiles to any open arm of the layout, but there is a family of games known as trains where each player plays on their own arm of the layout, known as a train, and can only play on another player's train in special circumstances.

Although the most usual connection rule is that the touching ends of adjacent tiles must have the same number of pips, other connection rules are possible. One of these is matador connection in which the total number pips on touching ends is a fixed number - for example 7 in the case of a [6:6] set, so that if an arm ends with s 2, the next tile played on that arm must have a 5 touching the 2.

Most domino connection games are shedding games in which the objective is to be the first to play all your tiles, or failing that to minimise the unplayed tiles you arte holding when the play ends. However, there are some games in which the objective is to score by creating particular configurations of tiles in the layout. The simplest of these are games of the Bergen family where a player scores whenever the layout has two or more equal ends. Then there is the Fives and threes family in which players score by making the ends of the layout add up to a multiple of five or three. Some recently invented games reward the creation of more complex patterns, such as enclosed cells, or particular number relationships.

Card games with dominoes. Dominoes can be used in a similar way to playing-cards to play the same types of games. Some of these are adaptations of games that are also played with playing-cards: others were specifically designed to be played with dominoes. There are

  • trick-taking games (point-trick, plain-trick and multi-trick) in which each player in turn plays a tile (or more than one) and the highest tile (or set) takes the trick,
  • fishing games in which tiles are played from hand to capture tiles from the table,
  • draw and discard games, in which a turn consists of drawing a new tile and discarding an unwanted tile, with the aim of collecting desrired tile combinations in hand,
  • adding games in which the aim is to collect or play tiles whose pips add up to a certain total,
  • partition games in which a player's hand must be divided into two or more subsets which compete with the corresponding subsets of the other players' hands,

and many other types, such as domino versions of Poker and Pelmanism (Memory).

Other domino games. Naturally, some newly invented domino games make use of novel mechanisms that do not fit naturally into the above categories. For example there are several dice matching domino games, which make use of the correpondence between domino tiles and the possible results of rolling two dice.

Acknowledgement

The establishment of the domino section of pagat.com was made possible by the Texan domino expert Joe Celko, who in 2001 generously donated the text of his unpublished book on domino games. Over the subsequent years, Joe's original game descriptions have been progressively revised and expanded and many further games added as a result of comments and contributions from readers and the discovery of new sources of information. Joe also provided the following useful introductory chapters:

Other Sites for Domino Rules, Equipment and Software

The American Domino Company, formerly known as Puremco, was founded in Texas in 1954 by George Purvis. They supply a range of traditional and custom made dominoes and also publish rules and information on domino games at dominorules.com.

Z. Teun Spaan's Domino Plaza also has a substantial collection of rules of games played with dominoes.

A collection of domino game rules in Polish is published on Kuba Libre's Dominogranie.

The AlexCramer Company supplies high quality precision made domino sets and hand-crafted wooden boxes for dominoes.

On the website Online Domino Games several domino games can be played against computer opponents.

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This page is maintained by John McLeod, john@pagat.com   © John McLeod, 2020. Last updated: 10 July 2020

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